Agenda

Program changes/substitutions may be made without notice.

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  • Closed  Closed
  • Optional  Optional
  • Friday, October 13, 2017
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    Friday Morning

    7:00 AM  -  8:00 AM
    Registration and Continental Breakfast
    8:00 AM  -  8:45 AM
    Vision and Conference Overview
    This conference is dedicated to coaching pioneer Sir John Whitmore who sadly passed away in April 2017.
    8:45 AM  -  9:45 AM
    The Science of Mindfulness
    Learn how to tell hype from truth about mindfulness. Daniel Goleman shares results from his new book with neuroscientist Richard Davidson, Altered Traits: Science Reveals How Meditation Transforms Mind, Brain and Body. Of more than 6000 journal articles on meditation about one percent use the highest standards for research. These most authoritative findings show how mindfulness can boost emotional resilience, attention, kindness, and lightness of being. However, highly effective coaching and leadership require more than just these. Emotional intelligence competencies add the crucial ingredients for high performance.
    9:45 AM  -  10:45 AM
    Quiet: How to Harness the Strengths of Introverts to Transform How We Work, Lead and Innovate
    Did you know that introverted leaders often deliver better results than extroverts? That the most spectacularly creative people tend to be introverts? That the most innovative thinking happens alone and not in teams? One of the central challenges of any business is to bring out the best in its employees. Yet when it comes to introverts—who make up a third to a half of the workforce—our leadership strategy mainly consists of asking them to act like extroverts. This is a serious waste of talent and energy. In an enlightening, relatable and practical talk, Susan Cain shows us that introverts think and work in ways that are crucial to the survival of today’s organizations. How can you structure your organization so that the best ideas dominate, rather than those of the most vocal and assertive people? How do introverts’ and extroverts’ different personalities cause them to solve problems and evaluate risk differently? What do introverts know about creativity that the rest of us should learn? Drawing on her original research and the latest in neuroscience and psychology, Cain will radically change your view of the best way to develop leaders, manage teams, make smart hires and stimulate innovation.
    10:45 AM  -  11:30 AM
    Break and Networking
     

    Specialty Keynotes

    11:30 AM  -  12:30 PM
    Leadership: Clarifying the Complexity of Evidence-based Approaches to Coaching: Frameworks and Models that will Delight!
    Coaching has rapidly become an accepted methodology for creating purposeful positive change in a wide range of organizational and individual settings worldwide. Not surprisingly, there is an increasing amount of coaching-related research being published. The volume and complexity of this research makes it difficult for many to analysis and utilise this body of knowledge. This session discusses the nature of evidence-based practice as it relates to coaching and then presents a two-by-two framework that highlights the relevance of a broad range of research to evidence-based coaching practice. From this broad perspective the session then becomes more granular presenting a 10-point multiple-perspective model of coaching research which can be used to identify and classify key themes in the coaching literature. The 10 perspectives are 1) coachee attributes; 2) coachee’s goals; 3) coachee’s personal system; 4) coach’s attributes; 5) coach’s goals and motivations; 6) coach’s personal system; 7) the coach-coachee relationship; 8) sponsor; 9) stakeholders; and 10) the broader system and the systemic impact of coaching. This model is then illustrated by reference to the past 20 years of coaching-specific research conducted at the University of Sydney.
    Speaker:
     Optional 
    11:30 AM  -  12:30 PM
    Positive Psychology: The “Greatest Hits” of Character Strengths: What Coaches Need to Know
    From the world’s leading organization in character strengths, learn about the latest science, concepts, and practices in character strengths – the area often referred to as “the backbone of positive psychology and well‐being.” This keynote will discuss new and seminal research findings on signature strengths; character strengths overuse, underuse, and optimal‐use; character strengths appreciation in relationships; the benefits of amplifying strengths versus remediating deficits; and research on character strengths in health, flourishing, and resilience. Practical implications of this research to coaching will be discussed.

    Before the session, be sure to take the free, scientific VIA Survey of strengths. (http://www.viacharacter.org/www/Character-Strengths-Survey#nav)
     Optional 
     

    Lunch

    12:30 PM  -  2:00 PM
    Lunch (On Your Own)
     

    Track 1

    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Special Topics: Mindful Habit Change
    Learn the neuroscience of mindfulness as it applies to helping clients alter deep-seated dysfunctional habits to allow more effective ways of relating. Daniel Goleman explains the science and Tara Bennett-Goleman shares specifics of her groundbreaking integration of mindfulness with practical steps for challenging and shifting ingrained ways of seeing, thinking, feeling and acting.
     Optional  Closed 
     

    Track 2

    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Leadership: Implementing a Leadership and Executive Coaching Program in an Australian Government Healthcare Setting: Successes and (Painful) Lessons Learnt
    The purpose of this presentation is to explore the efficacy of leadership coaching for individuals implementing strategic change in the Australian public health system and to report on both the successes and (painful) lessons learnt. One-to-one and group coaching formats were used in a large Australian government-run healthcare service. The one-to-one coaching was highly successful. Using a within-subjects (pre-post) design, participants (n= 31) undertook six one-hour coaching sessions. Coaching was conducted by professional leadership coaches. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected. Participation was associated with significant improvements in goal attainment, solution-focused thinking, leadership self-efficacy, perspective-taking capacity, self-insight and resilience, and ambiguity tolerance. There were significant reductions in stress and anxiety. The benefits of coaching transferred from the workplace to the home. Many participants reported being able to use insights gained in coaching in their personal lives, and reported better work/life balance, less stress and better quality relationships at home. In contrast the group coaching program was not very effective. As researchers we tend to report on “successful” outcomes - but reporting on what’s not been effective can be just as (or even more) informative as reports of “success”. I discuss the individual, political and systemic reasons for the lack of traction in the group coaching program, and make recommendations for the successful implementations of such programs.
    Speaker:
    Moderator:
     Optional 
     

    Track 3

    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Health and Wellness: Cutting the Coaching Edge at MGH

    Primary Care Coaching Program
    Ben Crocker, MD and Sarah Sherwood, MEd, MCHES, CHWC
    We will discuss the history of the care team model at APF, including the incorporation of health and wellness coaching in our primary care practice with highlights/examples of successful health coaching applications.

    Resident Coaching Program

    Kerri Palamara McGrath, MD
    This talk will review the “boots on the ground” approach using positive psychology principles to coach physicians in training at MGH and other residency programs around the country. In this model, physicians are trained in positive psychology coaching skills and paired with resident or fellow outside of their field of interest to create a safe space for reflection, goal-setting, and identification of strengths to overcome challenges and achieve goals. This award winning program has been spreading nationally to over 25 residency programs, and its impact has been evaluated in cohort and multisite studies with exciting impact on physicians in training and their faculty coaches. Dr. Palamara will provide an overview of the program, including the logistics of program development and implementation, curriculum, training, impact on physician well-being, and areas for future growth.

     Optional 
     

    Track 4

    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Positive Psychology: Boosting Flourishing, Fostering Resilience: Essential Character Strengths Tools for Good Coaching
    What is the latest science revealing about strengths interventions? How do I know if I really am a strengths‐based practitioner? How might I apply character strengths interventions in my coaching work? This workshop will answer these questions by bringing the new science of character strengths to life. You will practice with character strengths activities that help people flourish and manage stress/problems. You will walk away with essential tools you can begin using with your clients tomorrow.

    Before the session, be sure to take the free, scientific VIA Survey of strengths. (http://www.viacharacter.org/www/Character-Strengths-Survey#nav)

     Optional 
     

    Track 5

    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Special Topics: Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts–Becoming the Person You Want to Be
    Our reactions don’t occur in a vacuum. They are usually the result of unappreciated triggers in our environment—the people and situations that lure us into behaving in a manner diametrically opposed to the colleague, partner, parent, or friend we imagine ourselves to be. Marshall will share we can overcome the trigger points in our lives, and enact meaningful and lasting change both as coaches and for ourselves.
     Optional 
     

    Track 6

    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Research Symposium Leadership Coaching

    The good old wine of pragmatism in the new bottles of coaching and coaching research
    Tatiana Bachkirova, PhD

    Researchers and practitioners of coaching continue to be caught in the seemingly never-ending battle between modernism/positivism and postmodernism/constructionism. This divide is manifested in the practitioner’s self as an internal tension between competing sub-selves: the competent self and the dialogic self, with either ‘self’ dominating at different stages of the coaching process (Bachkirova, 2016). In this talk, we will explore what the frequently overlooked and misunderstood position of philosophical pragmatism offers for the coaching researchers. For coaches, this position highlights another sub-self: the pragmatic self, as a useful dimension of their identity. In this mode, the role of the practitioner subtly shifts from the professional use of skills and interventions (competent self) and from meaning making in the dialogue (dialogic self) to co-experimenting with new ways of acting in the world (pragmatic self). We will discuss the implications that may occur for researchers and practitioners when the centre of gravity of their professional self shifts towards the pragmatic self.

    The Silenced Female Leader: Coaching Women to Find Purposeful Voice
    Carrie Arnold, PhD

    This is a study of a leadership subcategory – the silenced female leader. Silencing theories have evolved over the last 45 years but have not intersected with women in leadership studies to explain how silencing is a variable for female leaders. This research sought to explore the lived experience of the silenced female leader by investigating how she was silenced, who or what silenced her, and the impact on her emotion, cognition, spirit, body, and leadership when she felt silenced. How she moved to purposeful voice and voice efficacy was also explored. The approach involved a mixed methods research study using a self-silencing measurement called the Silencing the Self Scale – Work (STSS-W). The instrument scores, along with results from four subscales, provided additional context on how she was self-silencing. The scores were correlated with findings from the rich and detailed lived experience captured in participant interviews using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA), resulting in a four-quadrant typology. The findings conclude that female leaders are subject to multiple forms of system, relationship, and self-silencing. Female leaders perceive their silencers as unknowingly incessant and experience silencing by both men and women. When female leaders are silenced, all their domains are virally impacted which causes a diminished sense of agency. Women may leave their leadership positions or opt out of leadership, but these changes do not consistently bring voice recovery. Coaching female leaders using new distinctions of silencing, purposeful voice and voice efficacy is a rich terrain for leadership coaches.

    Got Privilege? What does it have to do with Executive Coaching? Let’s talk about Intersectionality: race, class, gender variations, sexual orientation and multiple identities
    Gail Greenstein, EdD

    The International Coaching Federation promotes the use of Cultural Competence as a key competency for successful Executive Coaches. Serious limitations exist to using this as a framework. The research from Intersectionality scholars will be used to explore how Executive Coaches can build their critical consciousness by understanding the complex dimensions of social location, privilege, power and oppression. Intersectionality refers to the interaction between gender, race, and other categories of difference in individual lives, social practices, institutional arrangements, and cultural ideologies, and the outcomes of these interactions in terms of power. The research affirmed that the Executive Coaching literature mostly aligns with Cultural Competence. When Executive Coaches use an ‘intersectional’ lens and consider the matrix of power, privilege and oppression, clients will be able to experience an expanded and liberated view of their development and performance. This critical paradigm of Intersectionality will also help coaches better understand themselves, avoid blind spots, and support their clients in a larger context to affect relevant, sustainable change to become better leaders. These critical frameworks and new paradigms will ultimately support and generate more resilience for coachees and promote liberatory practices that enhance development of diverse client populations.

    How the behavioural changes are sustained by the manager-coachees over time after coaching ended
    Venkata Nanduri, PhD

    Participants perceptions of the effects of coaching a year later Abstract: This qualitative study using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) explored the perceptions of seven participants on the effects of coaching a year after the coaching ended. The research questions were, (1) How do participants perceive the effects of coaching and sustain changes one year later, (2) what challenges were experienced, and (3) what factors enabled them in sustaining their changes. The participants in this study were the seven middle managers whom the practitioner-researcher coached earlier a year ago. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews of the participants. Five themes identified related to the first research question are: (1) Goal setting, focus and achievement of goals, (2) Ability to think differently, (3) Changes in behaviour, (4) Increased self-awareness, and (5) Personal growth and development through increased self-confidence. The challenges participants faced (research question 2) were: lack of time and difficulties in making individual changes. The factors that enabled sustained changes (research question 3) were: self-discipline and focus, and self-motivation to change and develop. This study is expected to fill the knowledge gap existing on this topic. Key words: long term effects of coaching, changes, durable changes sustainability, factors, enablers, challenges.

    Moderator:
     Optional  Closed 
     

    Track 7

    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Research Symposium Health and Wellness

    Health & Wellness Coaching Compendium: New Resource for Practitioners and Researchers
    Gary Sforzo, PhD
    This session emphasizes the conception, evolution, and development of the Health & Wellness Coaching (HWC) Compendium.  The HWC Compendium is a systematically collected database containing the rapidly expanding body of literature describing HWC.  The Compendium contains HWC research sections addressing cancer, cardiovascular disease, cholesterol, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and wellness.  This talk will highlight the findings of the Compendium while examining the nature, quantity, quality, and general findings in these areas related to chronic disease and morbidity.  The Compendium will be on display and described as living resource to assist the practicing coach as well as the researcher examining HWC issues.

    GENErating Change: Health Coaching & Genetic Risk Testing to Change Risk Behaviors for Type 2 Diabetes and Heart Disease
    Ruth Wolever, PhD
    Military personnel are not exempt from increasing rates of overweight and obesity or the associated rising burden of coronary heart disease (CHD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) seen in the U.S. population. Innovative and clinically applicable approaches to addressing these chronic disease risks are needed; particularly approaches that motivate and support health behaviors for risk reduction. Risk assessment is central to preventive care, but historically has been based on clinical risk factors (e.g., blood pressure) alone. Over one hundred genetic markers associated with increased risk for CHD have been described, most strongly 9p21, and there are multiple markers associated with increased risk for T2D; importantly, risks remain modifiable with lifestyle changes. There may be an additive effect of a behavioral intervention like health coaching in conjunction with the provision of novel genetic risk information versus more familiar clinical risk information alone. Therefore, our study examined the clinical utility of providing people with genetic CHD and T2D risk information with and without concomitant health coaching using a 4 group (2X2) randomized controlled trial (RCT). We randomized 200 Air Force primary care patients with elevated risk status; the majority of participants were overweight or obese (81%); with prediabetes (54.4%); or elevated cholesterol (73%) and LDL (59%). While there were few significant differences in outcomes by genetic risk groups, the health coaching groups reported significant improvements in physical activity, reactions to risk status and depression. Overall, the findings provide support for health coaching as a behavioral intervention to improve health behaviors and risk factors; and particularly for those who are in higher genetic risk groups.

    Effects of a Health Coaching Program in Chronic Disease Employees of a Healthcare System: A pilot study of program design, factor correlations and health outcomes
    Joel S. Edman, DSc, FACN, CNS
    Health coaching supports nutrition and lifestyle characteristics, and may be particularly helpful for employees with chronic or complex health profiles. We present data from a health coaching program that targeted employees with at least one cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor. Design/Methods: Fifty-four healthcare system employees volunteered for this hospital-based health coaching program of at least one cycle of a 12-week, 6-session program. Coaching sessions were with a certified and experienced integrative nutritionist/health coach. Results/Findings: Seventy-four percent completed the coaching program. Average age was 53.3 years; 95 % were female; 77.5 % were Caucasian. 75% were obese or morbidly obese. 50 % experienced hypertension, 19% had diabetes/borderline diabetes and 16% had hyperlipidemia. 20% reported chronic pain and/or rehabilitation needs, and 17.5 % reported seasonal depression/winter blues. Participants averaged 7.8 coaching sessions over 5.5 months. Aerobic/weight training exercise improved (p<0.0001) and 85 % reduced their weight with an average loss of 8.5 pounds (p<0.0001). There was significant reduction in perceived stress (p<0.04) and a trend for improved sleep (p=0.06, using a numerical ratings scale). Self-reported symptom improvements included: 62.5% increased energy/less fatigue, 30% decreased gastrointestinal symptoms, and 20 % decreased headaches/migraines. Discussion: This study suggests that health coaching can significantly improve weight, CVD risk factors and overall quality of life. This is especially important for high risk, chronic disease employees who may have a vicious cycle of chronic disease and high stress. Future research is required to develop best practices for chronic disease employee engagement, lifestyle change and optimal health outcomes.

    Coaching Workers with Chronic Health Conditions: Common Challenges for Workers
    Alyssa McGonagle, PhD
    According to a Gallup poll, an estimated 68% of the U.S. working population has a chronic physical or mental health condition or chronic pain (Witters & Agrawal, 2011). Chronic health conditions, including chronic pain, present challenges to both workers and their employing organizations. Some workers with chronic health conditions may experience challenges related to meeting work demands, experiencing symptoms (most notably, pain and fatigue), maintaining work performance, communicating at work, time management, and workplace support (e.g., Detaille et al., 2013; Lerner et al. 2013; 2015; Oakman, 2016; 2017; Richard, 2011; Shaw et al., 2011; 2014; Tveito, 2010). The goal of this study is to illuminate the most common challenges related to working with chronic health conditions for coaches, so that they may be prepared to address them in the coaching engagement. We conducted a qualitative analysis of audio-recorded and transcribed coaching sessions from individuals who participated in a coaching intervention designed for workers with chronic health conditions. Study participants agreed to have their six 60-minute phone-based sessions recorded, and sessions were professionally transcribed (120 sessions total). Four trained research assistants conducted emergent thematic analysis to identify common themes. Results indicated that illness-related topics were discussed more frequently in session one. In subsequent sessions, the most frequently discussed illness topics were illness management and illness symptoms; followed by communication and impression management.

    Moderator:
     Optional 
     

    Friday Afternoon

    3:30 PM  -  4:00 PM
    Break and Networking
    4:00 PM  -  5:00 PM
    Two Perspectives on Stakeholder Centered Coaching: The Coach and the CEO

    *Recipient of the 1st Annual IOC Excellence in Leadership Award
    5:15 PM  -  6:45 PM
    Networking Reception and Poster Session
  • Saturday, October 14, 2017
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    Saturday Morning

    7:00 AM  -  8:00 AM
    Registration and Continental Breakfast
    8:00 AM  -  8:30 AM
    Welcome and Awards Presentations: Vision of Scientific Excellence Award Recipients: Janice Prochaska, PhD and James Prochaska, PhD
    8:30 AM  -  9:45 AM
    Restoring Leadership as a Noble Profession
    It is time to reclaim leadership as a noble profession that creates possibility and humaneness in the midst of increasing fear and turmoil, that inspires people to contribute to the common good and to work well together as teams and communities. As leaders, we need to commit to using our influence and power to create islands of sanity in the midst of this raging destructive sea. Drawing on her more than 40 years experience working with leaders on all continents, many of whom faced times of social disruption and loss, Dr. Wheatley challenges us to step forward as sane leaders, those who know how to restore and reinvigorate our best human qualities of generosity, creativity and community even as the general culture spirals into deeper fear, aggression and polarization.
    9:45 AM  -  10:30 AM
    Break and Networking
     

    Track 1

    10:30 AM  -  12:30 PM
    Special Topics: Immunity to Change

    This workshop delivers a personal experience of the cutting edge, “Immunity to Change” coaching model designed to help clients uncover and overcome the hidden mindsets that sabotage their efforts to reach important professional and personal goals. 


    This track continues at 2:00 pm. Attendees who select this track do not select a different track session in the afternoon.

     Optional 
     

    Specialty Keynotes

    10:30 AM  -  12:30 PM
    Health and Wellness: Coaching to Thrive and What Science Can Tell Us About the Good Life
    Coaching to Thrive
    James O. Prochaska, PhD
    Recent breakthroughs in the science and practice of changing the five biggest threats to health produce unprecedented impacts to enhance health, including behavioral health, and well-being. Common principles of change exist for behaviors including smoking, unhealthy diet, sedentary behavior, stress, and alcohol misuse. These principles organized around the stages of change can help individuals simultaneously change multiple risk behaviors while enhancing multiple domains of well-being. With compassion we can help more clients progress from suffering or struggling to thriving.

    What Science Can Tell Us About the Good Life
    Robert Waldinger, MD
    What happens to people as they go through life? Ever wonder what it would be like to be able to look at people’s entire adult lives? Not asking older people to remember, but actually starting with them as teenagers and tracking their health and wellbeing until they die? The Harvard Study of Adult Development is one of the longest studies of adult life ever done. It has tracked the lives of 724 men for 78 years from the time they were teenagers into old age. This talk reviews some of the most important lessons learned from the study, and some of the implications for how we find happiness and fulfillment in our lives today.
     Optional 
    10:30 AM  -  12:30 PM
    Leadership: Executive Coaching on the Cusp of Disruption: What's Up with the Mashup?
    With the workplace changing at an ever-faster pace, it’s not only organizational disruption that’s driving innovation, but personal disruption. Which means that coaching too is on the cusp of disruption. In this disruptive, mash-up keynote, you will explore 5 forces that are driving disruption in the executive coaching space, learn a seven-point framework of personal disruption, and reflect on what kind of disruptor you are and if it’s time to disrupt.
     Optional 
     

    Lunch

    12:30 PM  -  2:00 PM
    Lunch (On Your Own)
     

    Track 1

    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Special Topics: Immunity to Change
    This session is a continuation of the track session at 10:30 am.
     Optional 
     

    Track 2

    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Advanced Practice: The Sorrows of Aspiring Leaders: What Coaches Need to Know about Leadership in a VUCA World
    This session explores challenges and dilemmas faced by aspiring leaders in modern organizations. Based on both academic research findings and accounts from coaching and executive education practice, we will look at the quandaries and controversies that women and men preparing for higher levels of leadership roles currently face in their journey and feel particularly ambiguous about. Familiarity with the tensions experienced by aspiring leaders will prepare coaches to render better support to their clients (both organizations and individuals) and help manage their own vulnerability when working with executives. The conversation will evolve around micro-cases of challenges faced by coaches when working with today’s aspiring leaders from Europe, US, Latin America, Russia, and Asia-Pacific, as well as an abbreviated video coaching demonstration. Practical applications from recent research in the fields of leadership development and coaching will also be considered.

    Moderator:
     Optional 
     

    Track 3

    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Leadership: Preparing Leaders for the Future: Look Inward, Look Outward, Look Forward
    The future is coming at us faster than ever – it’s exponential. Leaders who are prepared will thrive and leaders who are not will fall behind. The same is true for coaches. Come to this session to learn how to use a simple framework to cultivate the adaptive capabilities, mindset, and practices that will enable you and your clients to thrive in a complex, rapidly changing world.
     Optional 
     

    Track 4

    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Health and Wellness: Coaching at Every Stage of Change
    This workshop will translate the Transtheoretical Model theory into practical applications. We will explain how to apply the principles and processes of change to each stage of change--Precontemplation (not ready), Contemplation (getting ready), Preparation (ready), Action, and Maintenance. Demonstration of a variety of techniques for applying the principles and processes will be offered through interactions with the audience. Strategies for multiple behavior change will be discussed.
    Moderator:
     Optional  Closed 
     

    Track 5

    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Special Topics: Beyond Beliefs: Going Further with Mindfulness, Courage, and Compassion

    I almost always address limiting beliefs in my coaching practice, don’t you? And, still, clients (and we) remain stuck in constraining patterns – vicious cycles. Science and experience inform us that to guide clients into virtuous cycles of growth requires a journey beyond beliefs – a path that includes the heart and body in the process.

    In our time together we’ll explore the research, practices, and application of using mindfulness to engage the heart (compassion) and gut (courage) to transcend defensive, well-honed limiting behaviors. We’ll study and apply somatic, mindful, and heart-centered tools to move from protection to learning and from frozen to flowing.

    When you attend this program you’ll learn how to:
     -  Apply a four step process to managing ambiguity and anxiety.
     -  Develop a plan for addressing fear in leadership.
     -  Analyze and minimize the barriers to addressing uncertainty in leadership.

    Speaker:
    Moderator:
     Optional 
     

    Track 6

    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Research Presentations: Health and Wellbeing in Different Contexts

    The health coach as a collaborative partner
    Reinhard Stelter, PhD
    For a number of years, motivational interviewing has been the gold standard in coaching for health and lifestyle change. But to ensure a sustainable change, the dialogue should not only focus on a final goal, but also include the coachee’s living conditions, personal narratives, and values. In both a one-on-one meetings or and within the group context, it is important to involve all participants collaboratively in the dialogue. Through personal experience and co-creative dialogue, meaning is shaped as the basis for a renewed understanding of oneself and the world. Reinhard Stelter will integrate theory, his own research, and case studies in this session.

    Clinical Evidence Development and Education of Medical Coaching for Narrative Based Medicine in Japan
    Kiyoshi Ando, PhD
    The importance of patient’s narratives has been focused on these last 20 years in medicine. However, the educational system for effective communication for medical personnel did not develop. We have developed both clinical evidence of the usefulness of coaching for narrative-based medicine and an education system for clinical coaching in Japan. 1) To examine the effect of tele-coaching intervention on psychological adjustment to illness and health-related QOL in patients with spinocerebellar degeneration. 2) To analyze and describe subjective evaluations of coaches and intervention subjects. 3) To develop an effective training program for medical personnel. Design and Methods: 12 independently living patients with spinocerebellar degeneration, aged 20–65 years old, received coaching intervention, which was postponed in another 12 (control group). Findings and Discussion: Analysis of covariance with baseline scores as the covariate showed the coaching group to have better self-efficacy scores than controls at follow-up (P=0.037). Content analysis revealed that the tele-coaching enabled patients to tell their own stories in a daily-life setting, encouraged them to experience and adopt fresh points of view, and helped them to start working towards attainable goals without giving up. Since we confirmed the usefulness of medical coaching based on the study, we developed an education system of medical coaching; Medical Coach Training Program (MCTP). MCTP is based on COACH A’s ICF-certified coaching training, with added contents for medical treatment. Two hundred and fifty two medical professionals finished the program during the last 7 years and were certified by the Japan Coach Association.

    Coaching for primary care physicians: preliminary findings from a study using positive psychology to improve well-being and reduce burnout and intentions to leave practice

    Alyssa McGonagle, PhD
    Primary Care Physicians (PCPs) are vulnerable to burnout and wanting to leave medical practice. We are currently conducting a randomized controlled trial of a positive psychology-based coaching intervention to help improve PCPs well-being and intentions to remain in medical practice and decrease levels of stress and burnout. Here, we present preliminary results from currently enrolled participants. Fifty PCPs were recruited from Boston-area medical practices to participate in coaching. Upon consenting, participants were randomized into either a primary (immediate-start) coaching group (n=26) or a waitlisted control group (6-month lag; n=24). Participants receive six coaching sessions over the course of three months from one of five study coaches. The first session is 60 minutes and focused on creating the coaching alliance, assessing strengths and setting client-centered goals. The five remaining sessions are 30 minutes and focused on topics and tools, based on the plan created in the first session. The first session was conducted in-person; all subsequent coaching sessions were conducted via phone. Preliminary analysis of the study outcomes for the primary group are all tending to show positive benefits from coaching that occurred in the three months between Time 1 and Time 2: lower negative variables (i.e., burnout, job stress, turnover intentions) and higher positive variables (i.e., psychological capital, compassion, job satisfaction, job self-efficacy and work engagement) after coaching. For the waitlisted group, the contrasts between Time 1 and Time 2 – during which no intervention occurred – showed no shifts other than reduced turnover intentions.

    Strategies and Two-year Results for a Vision-based Coaching Supplement to a Graduate Student Career Course

    Janice Sabatine, PhD

    Post-graduate trainees are experiencing career uncertainty and lack adequate advising on the full array of career options. A randomized controlled study is underway to evaluate the impact of supplementing a coaching-inspired career course with individual coaching based on Intentional Change Theory and Self-Determination Theory on the following outcomes: 1) career adaptability as measured by the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale; 2) self-authoring capacity as measured by the Career Decision Making Survey; 3) perceived stress, and 4) self-efficacy, both measured by surveys from the NIH Toolbox. In years one and two of a 3-year study, students were randomized to a course only (CO) (n=23) or a course plus coaching (CPC) (n=22) group. Students in the CPC group received 4 hours of coaching from one of three ICF credentialed coaches. The CPC group had significant increases in the concern and curiosity domains as well as overall career adaptability and frequently scored higher in additional survey items than did the CO group. In a six month post-course survey from year one, the increases in career adaptability domains were sustained in the CPC group. Feedback from the coaches again emphasized the importance and value of coaching based on the student’s vision and identifying and relying on supportive relationships. These findings indicate vision-based coaching as a viable intervention to modify career adaptability. While career adaptability and its corresponding domains of concern, control, curiosity, and confidence have been described as malleable traits, few studies have reported interventions to successfully increase these capacities, as described in this study.

    Moderator:
     Optional 
     

    Track 7

    2:00 PM  -  3:30 PM
    Leadership Coaching Research Symposium
    Sleeper effects in executive coaching: A new direction for coaching research?
    Gordon Spence, PhD
    This paper reports on the first formal investigation of "sleeper effects" in executive coaching. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the reflective nature of coaching requires time for many of the psychological and/or behavioral effects to be secured. As such, a lengthening of the timeframes surrounding the study of such effects seems important for gaining a more nuanced understanding of coaching outcomes. As such, this pilot investigation was guided by two questions. First, “what sleeper effects emerge for coachees within eight to 12 months of receiving executive coaching?” Second, “if sleeper effects do exist, to what extent can these effects be directly attributed to coaching?” In keeping with the exploratory nature of the research, qualitative (narrative) methods were used, with 15 semi-structured interviews conducted with participants from an earlier study. Each story was subject to a coded structural analysis and examined for key themes. Analysis of the data revealed several effects from coaching that appeared to have an enduring or a continuously developing quality. Key themes related to how participants had been (i) applying different communication styles, (ii) building firmer career foundations, (iii) becoming clearer about their career direction, (iv) developing confidence, and (v) being more self-reflective. However, on the whole, the evidence appeared to hint at the presence of sleeper effects without conclusively identifying them and has pointed to the need for some methodological adjustments for exploring sleeper effects. The paper will conclude with a set of recommendations for future research.

    Intentional Change Theory, Coaching and Leader Effectiveness
    Anne Marie Halton, PhD
    Leader development programs have had limited effectiveness in equipping leaders with the resources to achieve high performance in an increasingly complex world. Programs have largely focused on external factors such as tools, techniques and behavioral competencies. Executive coaching is emerging as a developmental approach well positioned to enhance inner resources of leaders. Intentional Change Theory (ICT) (Boyatzis, 2006) is proposed as a framework with underpinnings in complexity theory that is well matched to the demands of the current complex environment. Mixed methods were adopted to answer the research question 'How does coaching informed by Intentional Changed Theory enhance leader effectiveness?' Quantitative and qualitative data were obtained over a 2-month period from 19 senior leaders, comprising a survey to measure the impact of the coaching on the leaders, and in-depth interviews to explore their experiences of the coaching. The survey results were non significant. This may have been explained by the short program duration, or by the measurement items. The semi-structured interviews indicated that the coaching contributed to the development of inner resources such as self-efficacy, self-awareness, and psychological capital, all of which formed part of an emerging leader identity. Furthermore, the data indicated that increasing comfort with ambiguous situations, and with challenging emotions were important for leader effectiveness. This research corroborates existing studies indicating the positive impact of executive coaching, extending this to suggest that coaching informed by ICT can develop additional inner resources contributing to leader effectiveness.

    Professional Coaching as a Protective Intervention against Psychosocial Risks. Results of an Experimental Field Study
    Lucy Van Hove, PhD
    This study aimed to investigate whether professional coaching, focused on developing management skills, would also impact emotional intelligence and stress levels. To answer these questions, a longitudinal RCT study was set up in a large organization among 48 managers. Control group and intervention group underwent emotional intelligence, stress and neuroticism measures at one-year interval. Results indicate that the coaching intervention, even though mainly focused on the development of management skills, had a significant impact on emotional intelligence and neuroticism, and played a protective role against stress and psychosocial risks.

    Using the Transformative Transition Coaching framework to support leaders during career transitions
    Nicky Terblanche, PhD
    Career transitions present unique and daunting challenges to organisational leader (Charan, Drotter, & Noel, 2011). Failure is prevalent with significant cost to both the individual and the organisation (Martin & Gentry, 2011) and organisations are not doing enough to support transitioning leaders. Coaching is sometimes used to support transitioning leaders, but limited empirical research has been conducted into transition coaching. Career transitions present potential ‘disorienting dilemmas’, which open up the potential for significant learning. Transformative learning theory describes deep, lasting change in individual’s meaning perspectives (Mezirow, 1994). The empirically developed Transformative Transition Coaching framework operationalizes transformative learning theory within a transition coaching process in an attempt to facilitate the permanent change of problematic perspectives that may prevent transitioning leaders to succeed.
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    Stepping Toward the Future, Together
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